Public Health Recognition Events

January

Cervical Health Awareness Month

Cervical Health Awareness Month is a chance to raise awareness about how women can protect themselves from HPV (human papillomavirus) and cervical cancer. HPV is a very common infection that spreads through sexual activity. It’s also a major cause of cervical cancer.

About 79 million Americans currently have HPV. Many people with HPV don’t know they are infected. And each year, more than 11,000 women in the United States get cervical cancer.

February

American Heart Month

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Every year, 1 in 4 deaths are caused by heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

March

 Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States and the second leading cause of death from cancer. Colorectal cancer affects people in all racial and ethnic groups and is most often found in people age 50 and older.

The good news? If everyone age 50 and older were screened regularly, 6 out of 10 deaths from colorectal cancer could be prevented. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to encourage people to get screened.

April

Alcohol Awareness Month

Drinking too much alcohol increases people’s risk of injuries, violence, drowning, liver disease, and some types of cancer. The good news? We can all do our part to prevent alcohol misuse or abuse. Spread the word about strategies for preventing alcohol abuse and encourage communities, families, and individuals to get involved.

How can Alcohol Awareness Month make a difference? We can use this month to raise awareness about alcohol abuse and take action to prevent it, both at home and in the community.

Sexual Violence Awareness Month

April is a month dedicated to raising awareness about sexual violence and increasing the public’s understanding about sexual violence in our society. It also provides opportunities for the community to be directly involved in supporting victims and survivors, their families, and organizations that provide crisis intervention throughout the year. Sexual violence prevention requires many voices and roles. Prevention is possible and we all can make a difference.

May

Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month

With 5.4 million cases in more than 3.3 million people diagnosed annually, skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Fortunately, skin cancer is also one of the most preventable forms of cancer and highly treatable when detected early. May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month and we’re counting on YOU.

National Public Health Week 

As part of National Public Health Week, the Nevada Public Health Foundation is unveiling its new website designed to help Nevadans address critical health issues facing the state, like obesity. NPHF.org highlights Nevada’s public health standings and offers resources for awareness, education and collaboration.

Based on national public health indicators, Nevada ranked 37th in overall public health in 2013.

Nevada now has the 12 lowest adult obesity rate in the nation, according to The State of Obesity: Better Policies for a Healthier America. Nevada’s adult obesity rate is 26.2 percent, up from 21.3 percent in 2004 and from 13.1 percent in 1995.

June

National Safety Month

Injuries are a leading cause of disability for people of all ages – and they are the leading cause of death for Americans ages 1 to 44. But there are many things people can do to stay safe and prevent injuries.

Make a difference: Spread the word about ways to reduce the risk of injuries. Encourage communities, workplaces, families, and individuals to identify and report safety hazards.

June 15 – World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

August

National Immunization Awareness Month

Immunization, or vaccination, helps prevent dangerous and sometimes deadly diseases. To stay protected against serious illnesses like the flu, measles, and pneumonia, adults need to get their shots – just like kids do.

National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to promote vaccines and remind family, friends, and coworkers to stay up to date on their shots.

Learn more about childhood immunizations here.

September

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

One in 3 children in the United States are overweight or obese. Childhood obesity puts kids at risk for health problems that were once seen only in adults, like type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.

The good news? Childhood obesity can be prevented. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for kids to eat healthier and get more active.

October

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast cancer is the second most common kind of cancer in women. About 1 in 8 women born today in the United States will get breast cancer at some point.

The good news is that many women can survive breast cancer if it’s found and treated early. A mammogram – the screening test for breast cancer – can help find breast cancer early when it’s easier to treat.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month is a chance to raise awareness about the importance of early detection of breast cancer. Make a difference! Spread the word about mammograms and encourage communities, organizations, families, and individuals to get involved.

National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic violence effects people of all ages – Elders to children. It impacts women and men. No one is immune to this crime, but we all can advocate against domestic violence.

Please visit the link to learn how YOU can be involved in campaigning against domestic violence.

November

American Diabetes Month

Diabetes is one of the leading causes of disability and death in the United States. It can cause blindness, nerve damage, kidney disease, and other health problems if it’s not controlled.

One in 11 Americans have diabetes — that’s more than 29 million people. And another 86 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

December

World AIDS Day

World AIDS Day is a global initiative to raise awareness, fight prejudice, and improve education about HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. World AIDS Day is December 1.

Around the world, about 37 million people are living with HIV. In the United States, about 44,000 people get infected with HIV every year.

The only way to know if you have HIV is to get tested. It’s important that everyone ages 15 to 65 gets tested for HIV at least once. Some people may need to get tested more often.

 

Please contact pam@nphf.org for suggestions to add on this page.